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EEOC Releases Sample ADA Notice for Employee Wellness Programs

In our June 2, 2016, article summarizing final wellness program regulations issued by the EEOC under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), we noted the EEOC’s promise to post on its website a sample notice by which employers could satisfy the ADA’s notification requirements. The EEOC has today posted such a sample notice, along with a series of FAQs shedding further light on the notification requirement. Although employers are not required to use this sample notice, they should make sure that their notice covers all the points addressed in the EEOC sample.

New EEOC Guidance on Employee Wellness Programs

Final regulations issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) under both the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (“GINA”) will require modifications to many employee wellness programs. These modifications may include the deletion of certain questions from health risk assessments, additional employee notification requirements, and a reduction in the incentives used to discourage tobacco usage. Although certain aspects of these regulations will not apply until the first day of the 2017 plan year, others are already in effect.

DOL Releases Final Regulation Defining Investment Fiduciaries

After years of effort, the Department of Labor released final rules on April 6, 2016, that will substantially alter the way investment advice is provided to ERISA plans, their participants, and even non-ERISA IRAs.

You Can Run But You Can’t Hide: HIPAA Audits are Coming

On March 21, 2016, the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) announced that it has begun “Phase 2” of audits of covered entities and their business associates for compliance with the HIPAA Privacy, Security and Breach Notification Rules (“HIPAA Rules”). Phase 1 was limited to a pilot program designed to develop a standard set of audit protocols.

HIPAA Hodgepodge

After more than ten years, HIPAA is still a hot topic. Here is a rundown of recent developments.

You’ve (Still) Got to Be Kidding: Supreme Court Holds ERISA Plan Participants May Ignore Reimbursement Provisions If They Spend the Money Fast Enough

The Supreme Court has handed down its latest in a long line of decisions on enforcing the reimbursement provisions of self-funded ERISA welfare plans. As evidenced by the Court’s lopsided 8-1 decision, the result in Montanile v. Board of Trustees of the National Elevator Industry Health Benefit Plan will not surprise those familiar with the law in this area. But as indicated by Justice Ginsburg’s indignant dissent, plan sponsors may find the decision downright bizarre. After all, it tells participants who double-recover for medical benefits paid by their employer’s health plan that they’re off the hook – if they spend the money fast enough.

Another Court Rejects EEOC Position on ADA and Wellness Programs

Following the lead of Seff v. Broward County, another federal court has disagreed with the EEOC on the scope of an ADA exemption for employee benefit plans. In EEOC v. Flambeau, Inc., the court held that this benefit-plan “safe harbor” could be used to justify a wellness program that included both a health risk assessment and a biometric screening.

IRS Extends ACA-Reporting Deadlines

In a belated Christmas present, the IRS on December 28th extended the deadlines for large employers and health insurers to comply with certain reporting requirements imposed by the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”).  Notice 2016-4 grants an additional two months to provide statements to employees, and an additional three months to transmit those statements to the IRS.

IRS Issues Guidance for Integrated HRAs

In a recent Chief Counsel Advice (CCA 201547006), the IRS has provided guidance for employers wishing to offer health reimbursement arrangements (“HRAs”) that both (1) provide reimbursements on a tax-free basis, and (2) satisfy the “market reform” requirements of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”). In particular, this CCA focuses on HRAs (and similar “employer payment plans”) that reimburse employees for medical premiums paid for coverage under a health plan maintained by a spouse’s employer.

Prohibited Transactions: Co-investments Involving Qualified Retirement Plans

Under both ERISA and the Internal Revenue Code, certain transactions involving qualified retirement plans and “disqualified persons” or “parties in interest” (such as a plan trustees) are prohibited. One example of a “prohibited transaction” involves a plan fiduciary (e.g., plan trustee) using plan assets to purchase property for his own benefit or as an indirect loan because he cannot afford the purchase without the plan assets (ERISA § 406).

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