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Health Plans

ACA-Reporting Deadline Extended by 30 Days

The Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) imposed additional reporting requirements on health coverage providers (including self-funded employer plans) and “applicable large employers” (those with 50 or more full-time employees). In Notice 2016-70, the IRS has granted coverage providers and employers 30 more days to issue the appropriate ACA-reporting forms to their insureds and full-time employees for coverage provided during 2016. Rather than January 31, 2017, these Forms 1095-B and 1095-C will now be due by March 2, 2017. In addition, the IRS has extended by one year the period of “good-faith compliance” with these reporting rules. As of now, however, the IRS has not extended the deadline for coverage providers and employers to transmit these ACA-reporting forms to the IRS.

EEOC Releases Sample ADA Notice for Employee Wellness Programs

In our June 2, 2016, article summarizing final wellness program regulations issued by the EEOC under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”), we noted the EEOC’s promise to post on its website a sample notice by which employers could satisfy the ADA’s notification requirements. The EEOC has today posted such a sample notice, along with a series of FAQs shedding further light on the notification requirement. Although employers are not required to use this sample notice, they should make sure that their notice covers all the points addressed in the EEOC sample.

New EEOC Guidance on Employee Wellness Programs

Final regulations issued by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) under both the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (“GINA”) will require modifications to many employee wellness programs. These modifications may include the deletion of certain questions from health risk assessments, additional employee notification requirements, and a reduction in the incentives used to discourage tobacco usage. Although certain aspects of these regulations will not apply until the first day of the 2017 plan year, others are already in effect.

Another Court Rejects EEOC Position on ADA and Wellness Programs

Following the lead of Seff v. Broward County, another federal court has disagreed with the EEOC on the scope of an ADA exemption for employee benefit plans. In EEOC v. Flambeau, Inc., the court held that this benefit-plan “safe harbor” could be used to justify a wellness program that included both a health risk assessment and a biometric screening.

IRS Extends ACA-Reporting Deadlines

In a belated Christmas present, the IRS on December 28th extended the deadlines for large employers and health insurers to comply with certain reporting requirements imposed by the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”).  Notice 2016-4 grants an additional two months to provide statements to employees, and an additional three months to transmit those statements to the IRS.

IRS Issues Guidance for Integrated HRAs

In a recent Chief Counsel Advice (CCA 201547006), the IRS has provided guidance for employers wishing to offer health reimbursement arrangements (“HRAs”) that both (1) provide reimbursements on a tax-free basis, and (2) satisfy the “market reform” requirements of the Affordable Care Act (“ACA”). In particular, this CCA focuses on HRAs (and similar “employer payment plans”) that reimburse employees for medical premiums paid for coverage under a health plan maintained by a spouse’s employer.

Certain Mid-Sized Employers May Have Even MORE Time to Comply with the ACA’s Play-or-Pay Rules

Thanks to a special transition rule, employers with 50 to 99 full-time employees (including full-time equivalents) are generally shielded from the Affordable Care Act’s “play-or-pay” penalties until January 1, 2016. Moreover, in a wrinkle that is easily overlooked, any such “mid-sized” employer that already sponsors a health plan operating on a non-calendar-year basis has even more time to comply with these rules.

Same-Sex Marriage Ruling Impacts Benefit Plans (Again)

On Friday, June 26, 2015, the Supreme Court published its ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, holding (by a 5 to 4 margin) that the Fourteenth Amendment requires a state to license marriages between two people of the same sex, and to recognize any such marriage that is lawfully licensed and performed out-of-state. As a result, all (remaining) state laws or constitutional amendments banning same-sex marriage are now invalid.

Supreme Court Upholds Affordable Care Act Subsidies

The Supreme Court announced today that it has upheld Affordable Care Act (“ACA”) subsidies for insurance purchased on federally-facilitated exchanges. By a 6 to 3 vote, the Court concluded that the statute allows for subsidies on any exchange created under the ACA. The decision in King v. Burwell may come as a disappointment to some who hoped that the subsidies would be struck down and that the entire ACA would unravel in the aftermath.

EEOC Proposes ADA Rules on Wellness Program Incentives

The EEOC has issued proposed regulations providing guidance on the extent to which the ADA permits employers to offer incentives to employees to promote participation in wellness programs that are employee health programs. The new guidance is similar, but not identical, to the rules governing incentives for health-contingent wellness programs under HIPAA. Employers should review their wellness programs to ensure compliance with both laws.

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