Spencer Fane LLP Logo
Latest Posts

SECURE Act Generates Changes and Opportunities for Retirement Plans

In the waning days of 2019, President Trump signed into law the most significant retirement legislation in more than a decade.  The Setting Every Community Up for Retirement Enhancement – or “SECURE” – Act includes far-reaching changes that affect qualified retirement plans, 403(b) and 457(b) plans, IRAs, and other employee benefits.  In a series of articles, we will describe key provisions of the Act.  Our first article provides an overview of the Act’s key provisions and their effective dates.  Some of the changes under the SECURE Act are effective immediately, while others are effective for plan or tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2020.  Although the Act generally provides sufficient time to amend plan documents, employers must modify certain aspects of plan administration (and potentially financial planning decisions) now to align with the SECURE Act’s more immediate requirements.

IRS Again Grants ACA-Reporting Relief (Plus a Limited Bonus)

In Notice 2019-63, the IRS has granted health insurers and large employers 30 more days to issue the appropriate 2019 ACA-reporting forms to their insureds and full-time employees.  Rather than January 31, 2020, these Forms 1095-B and 1095-C will now be due by March 2, 2020.  The IRS has also extended the “good-faith” standard for compliance with these reporting rules.  Finally, in view of the zeroing out of the penalty for failing to comply with the ACA’s individual mandate, insurers and large employers will now have an additional compliance option.

2020 Inflation Adjustments

Following announcements by both the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration, we know most of the dollar amounts that employers will need in order to administer their benefit plans for 2020.  The key dollar amounts for retirement plans and individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”) are shown on the front side of our 2020 limits card.

The reverse side of the card shows a number of dollar amounts that employers will need to know in order to administer health flexible spending accounts (“FSAs”), health savings accounts (“HSAs”), and high-deductible health plans (“HDHPs”), as well as health plans that are not grandfathered under the Affordable Care Act.

A laminated version of our 2020 limits card is available upon request.  To obtain one or more copies, please contact any member of our Employee Benefits Group.  You also can contact the Spencer Fane Marketing Department at 816-474-8100 or marketing@spencerfane.com.

Department of Labor Proposes New Safe Harbor for Electronic Disclosures

The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) has proposed a  new “safe harbor” rule to allow retirement plan disclosures to be posted online (assuming certain notice requirements are satisfied) to reduce printing and mailing expenses for plan sponsors and to make the disclosures more readily accessible and useful for plan participants.

IRS Finalizes Hardship Distribution Rules

The IRS has issued final regulations modifying and clarifying the rules for in-service hardship distributions from 401(k) and 403(b) plans.  The final regulations are substantially similar to the proposed regulations issued in November of 2018, but they contain a few changes of which plan sponsors should be aware.

An Uncashed Check is Taxable

The IRS issued Revenue Ruling 2019-19 to describe the tax and reporting treatment of uncashed distribution checks from tax-qualified retirement plans.  The ruling describes a situation in which a plan is required to make a distribution and the participant receives the distribution check, but does not cash it.  The ruling makes clear that, regardless of why the participant does not cash the check (or even if the participant cashes the check in a later year), the distribution is subject to applicable tax withholding and reporting in the year in which the distribution is made.  In addition, the participant must include the distribution in his or her gross income for that same year.

SEC Adopts Rulemaking Package – “Solely Incidental” Broker-Dealer Exclusion

On June 5, 2019, the Securities and Exchange Commission adopted a rulemaking package that applies to investment advisers and broker-dealers.

This is the fourth in a series of articles describing the SEC’s rulemaking package.  This article addresses the SEC’s Interpretation of the “Solely Incidental” Broker-Dealer Exclusion.  That exclusion allows broker-dealers to provide certain advisory services without becoming subject to regulation as investment advisers under the Advisers Act, as long as those services are “solely incidental” to the broker-dealers’ core business.  The SEC’s new interpretation of this exclusion provides some helpful guidance for broker-dealers and dually-registered firms.

SEC Adopts Rulemaking Package – Form CRS

On June 5, 2019, the Securities and Exchange Commission adopted a rulemaking package that applies to investment advisers and broker-dealers.  These rules include a new set of disclosure requirements to address retail investor confusion over brokerage and investment advisory services.

This is the third in a series of articles describing the SEC’s rulemaking package.  This article provides an overview of the Form CRS – Relationship Summary portion of the package.

SEC Adopts Rulemaking Package – Investment Adviser Standard of Conduct

On June 5, 2019, the Securities and Exchange Commission adopted a rulemaking package that applies to investment advisers and broker-dealers.  In a series of four articles, Spencer Fane LLP outlines the SEC’s rulemaking package.  Our first article summarized “Regulation Best Interest” a new standard of conduct governing broker-dealers.  In this second article, we describe the SEC’s interpretation of the standard of conduct that applies to investment advisers when they engage with their clients.

SEC Adopts Rulemaking Package – Regulation Best Interest

On June 5, 2019, the Securities and Exchange Commission adopted a rulemaking package that is applicable to investment advisers and broker-dealers.  The package includes two final rules and two interpretations – Regulation Best Interest, Investment Adviser Standard of Conduct Interpretation, Form CRS – Relationship Summary, and Solely Incidental Broker-Dealer Exclusion Interpretation.  The Regulation Best Interest and Form CRS requirements are effective 60 days after they are published in the Federal Register, with a transition period for compliance that ends on June 30, 2020.  The SEC’s interpretations are effective immediately upon publication in the Federal Register.  In a series of four articles, Spencer Fane LLP outlines the SEC’s rulemaking package.  This first article describes the Regulation Best Interest portion of the SEC’s package.

1 2 3 9 Showing 1-10 of 86 results View All