Spencer Fane LLP Logo
Latest Posts

Another court rules that contractual consent to be called using an ATDS cannot be unilaterally revoked

The Telephone Consumer Protection Act,  47 U.S.C. § 227 (TCPA),  makes it unlawful for any person, absent the “prior express consent of the called party,” to make non-emergency calls using any Automated Telephone Dialing System (ATDS) to any telephone number assigned to a cellular telephone service. Anyone who violates the TCPA may be liable for “actual monetary loss” or $500 in damages for each violation, whichever is greater.

Ninth Circuit: Seller is not liable for calls made by telemarketer in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act

In a recent decision that may affect any company that sells products or services using telemarketers, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit affirmed the district court’s grant of summary judgment in Jones v. Royal Admin. Servs., Inc. in favor of a product seller, holding the seller was not vicariously liable for calls made by a telemarketer in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act[1] (TCPA) because the telemarketer was an independent contractor.

Eleventh Circuit: Consumers may “partially revoke” consent to be called by automatic dialing systems

In a new decision that may have important implications for telemarketers and others using automatic dialing systems, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit held in the case of Schweitzer v. Comenity Bank that the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) allows a consumer to partially revoke his or her consent to receive automated telemarketing calls.

A federal district court in California denies class certification to a nationwide putative TCPA class of consumers against a debt collector who allegedly made more than 500 million prohibited calls

The United States District Court for the Southern District of California recently issued an order denying class certification to a nationwide putative class of consumers against The CBE Group, Inc. (“CBE”), which alleged that CBE made over 500 million calls to these consumers’ cell phones without their prior express consent in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, 47 U.S.C. § 227, et seq. (“TCPA”).  Blair, et al. v. The CBE Group, Inc., No. 3:13-cv-00134-MMA-WVG (S.D. Cal. August 26, 2015).

The Sixth Circuit sheds light on meaning of “prior express consent” under the TCPA in a case involving hundreds of calls to a debtor’s cellphone by a creditor using an autodialer

One thing that telemarketers and other companies that communicate with their customers by calling their customer’s cellphones crave is clarity under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”), 47 U.S.C. § 227.  The Sixth Circuit recently shed some light on the meaning of “prior express consent” under the TCPA in connection with calls by a creditor to its debtor’s cellphone in the case of Hill v. Homeward Residential, Inc., No. 14-4168 (6th Cir. August 21, 2015).

The Eleventh Circuit rules that Capital One is not a debt collector under the FDCPA with respect to defaulted credit card debt it acquired from HSBC

In the case of Davidson v. Capital One Bank (USA), N.A., No. 14-14200 (August 21, 2015), the Eleventh Circuit had occasion to decide whether a bank that collects on defaulted debt it acquired from another bank is a “debt collector” under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), 15 U.S.C. §§ 1692-1692p.

Manufacturer’s Corner: FTC Announces Nothing

In 2011, the FTC requested public comment regarding its interpretations, rules, and guides issued under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.  After four years of hard work, the FTC today issued a press release headlined “FTC Will Keep Consumer Product Warranty Rules in Current Form with Some Modifications.”

Can a Rule 68 offer of judgment that offers complete relief to the named plaintiff in a putative class action moot the entire case? While federal courts continue to reach different conclusions, the Supreme Court may finally weigh in

One tactic often used with varying degrees of success to thwart putative class actions brought under various federal statutes is to file an early offer of judgment under Rule 68 that provides the named plaintiff or plaintiffs complete relief in an effort to moot the putative class claims at the inception of a class case.

Federal Judge in California brings down the curtain on a FCRA class action against Paramount Pictures

Class actions alleging technical violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) against employers who obtain consumer reports on job applicants are all the rage, generating large settlements and headlines (at least in legal circles).

The bona fide error defense to FDCPA claims is alive and well in the Eleventh Circuit

In the case of Isaac, et al. v. RMB, Inc., et al., No. 14-11560 (11th Cir. March 17, 2015), the Eleventh Circuit recently upheld summary judgment in favor of a debt collector based on the affirmative defense of bona fide error.  The case presents a good opportunity to see what type of evidence is needed to prevail on the defense.

A federal district court sidesteps Crawford in dismissing claim for FDCPA violation based on filing a proof of claim on a time-barred debt in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy

In a 2014 decision rued by debt collectors everywhere, the Eleventh Circuit in Crawford v. LVNV Funding, LLC, 758 F.3d 1254 (11th Cir. 2014) ruled that filing a proof of claim to collect a time-barred debt in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy violated the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act

Home mortgage lenders hire law firm to send 88,937 collection letters to defaulted borrowers: Borrowers allege this violated the FDCPA and a federal judge certifies the class

In Lori Jo Vincent, et al. v. The Money Store, Inc. et al, No. 03 cv 2876 (S.D.N.Y.  February 2, 2015), the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York certified a class of home mortgage borrowers who defaulted on their loans and received uniform “breach letters” from a law firm sent on behalf of the defendant mortgage servicing company and the defendant lenders. 

Manufacturer’s Corner: President Proposes New Federal Data Breach Notification Law

Shortly before issuing his State of the Union address, President Obama released a proposed federal law mandating notification to individuals whose personal information is compromised in certain data breaches.  Not long ago, I wouldn’t have written about this issue in a Manufacturer’s Corner column, but since I recently decided that the Internet of Things will expose manufacturers to litigation over data privacy, it seems appropriate.

Unfair Competition: Righting Wrongs

If you’re in business, chances are you’ve experienced unfair marketing tactics by one or more of your competitors. Such tactics may include false or misleading advertising or representations concerning the nature or quality of the competitor’s products or services. Or, they may consist of false or misleading statements about what you sell.
You need not stand by while your competition engages in such underhanded tactics.

Is a communication between a debt collector and a credit reporting agency a communication “in connection with the collection of any debt” for purposes of the FDCPA?

In a case in which the Eighth Circuit found against a debtor on her claim against a collection agency based on the FDCPA, the court nevertheless adopted a standard followed by other circuits in defining when a communication is “…in connection with the collection of any debt” for purposes of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA), 15 U.S.C. §§ 1692 et seqSarah McIvor v. Credit Control Services, Inc., No. 14-1164 (December 4, 2014).

The Sixth Circuit rules that making an offer to settle a valid but time-barred debt may give rise to an FDCPA violation.

In a case that will likely cause debt collectors seeking to collect time-barred obligations grave concern, the Sixth Circuit recently ruled that making an offer to settle a time-barred debt at a discount could mislead an unsophisticated consumer to believe the debt could be enforced in court in violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act.  Buchanan v. Northland Group, Inc., No. 13-2523 (January 13, 2015).

Class certification denied to putative class alleging Quest Diagnostics engaged in consumer fraud by routinely overbilling patients

The Third Circuit recently affirmed denial of certification of a class of patients who alleged that the medical testing company, Quest Diagnostics, Inc., routinely overbilled patients.  See Grandalski, et a. v. Quest Diagnostics, Inc., et al., No. 13-4329 (September 11, 2014).  Quest Diagnostics is the country’s largest provider of medical testing.

Antitrust “market allocation” claims against nation’s two biggest grocery wholesalers survive summary judgment

In In re: Wholesale Grocery Products Antitrust Litigation, No. 13-1297 (May 21, 2014), the Eighth Circuit allowed an antitrust case brought by a small town, family owned grocery store in Iowa, D&G, Inc.,[1] to continue against the nation’s two largest wholesale distributors, SuperValu, Inc. and C&S Wholesale Grocers, Inc., finding disputed facts prevented summary judgment.

18 results View Less