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New Age Harassment: When Will the Next Shoe Drop? What to Do When You Learn One of YOUR Employees Might Be on the Naughty List.

Who will be next? After Matt Lauer, Garrison Keiller, and Russell Simmons each faced assertions of inappropriate conduct in the last week, the “who’s next” question predominates pop culture and the daily news cycle. In the wake of numerous sexual harassment accusations unfolding across Hollywood and corporate America, sexual harassment has become one of the hottest topics in today’s news. While claims of sexual harassment in the workplace are nothing new, the almost daily media coverage of so many high-profile claims will likely result in an increase in reports of sexual harassment allegations for many employers in the immediate future.

Deadline for OSHA Electronic Reporting Rule Delayed Until December 15, 2017

OSHA has delayed the December 1, 2017, deadline for the Electronic Reporting Rule until December 15, 2017.  This rule requires a wide range of establishments to electronically submit injury and illness information from their OSHA Forms 300A.  The deadline extension was announced via a November 24, 2017, OSHA notice in the Federal Register.

Deadline for OSHA Electronic Reporting Rule Fast Approaching

Employers have until December 1, 2017, to electronically submit injury and illness information from their 2016 Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (Form 300A) under OSHA’s 2016 Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses Rule (“Electronic Reporting Rule” or “the Rule”).

The Tivol Decision – Must An Employer Challenge The Issuance of an MCHR Right-To-Sue Letter By Filing A Writ of Mandamus?

The Missouri Supreme Court recently issued an opinion that clarifies when it is appropriate to challenge the issuance of a Missouri Commission on Human Rights (“MCHR”) right-to-sue letter.

Major Changes to Missouri Human Rights Act Signed Into Law by Governor Greitens

On Friday, June 30, 2017, Missouri Governor Eric Greitens signed Senate Bill 43 into law. The Bill implements significant changes to the Missouri Human Rights Act (“MHRA”) and will likely have a significant impact on the litigation of MHRA claims. When he signed the legislation, Governor Greitens touted Senate Bill 43 for bringing Missouri law in closer alignment with the standards under federal law and 38 other states’ laws.

7th Circuit Holds That Title VII’s Prohibition on Sex Discrimination Includes A Prohibition on Sexual Orientation Discrimination

On April 4, 2017, the en banc Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals overruled its own precedent and became the first Circuit to hold that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation can constitute unlawful sex discrimination under Title VII.

Requirements for Arizona employers to stay in compliance with new paid sick leave law

In November, 2016, voters in the State of Arizona adopted Proposition 206, known as The Fair Wages and Healthy Families Initiative. As of July 1, 2017, all employers in Arizona must provide employees with paid sick leave.

St. Louis City Minimum Wage Set To Increase to $10 Per Hour

Today, the Circuit Court for the City of St. Louis, Missouri lifted an injunction that had blocked a St. Louis City ordinance increasing the minimum wage for St. Louis City businesses. This action came after the Missouri Supreme Court ruled that state law did not prohibit the higher local minimum wage.

The EEOC’s Proposed Enforcement Guidance on Unlawful Harassment

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has issued proposed enforcement guidance on unlawful harassment (the “Proposed Guidance”). The Proposed Guidance is intended to be a follow-up to the EEOC’s Select Task Force on the Study of Harassment in the Workplace in 2016 (“2016 Harassment Study”). The Proposed Guidance provides a detailed explanation of the EEOC’s position on the three components of a hostile work environment claim: 1) covered bases and causation; 2) hostile work environment threshold; and 3) liability.

Steps for Employers to Avoid Violating the Fair Credit Reporting Act

The federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (“FCRA”) outlines a strict procedure that employers must follow when they obtain criminal background reports, credit histories, and other background reports on employees and applicants from a third party which is engaged in the business of preparing such reports. All such reports are called “consumer reports” under FCRA.

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