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Missouri Revises its Model Environmental Covenant for Activity and Use Limitations on Contaminated Sites


December 14, 2012 4:49 PM | Posted by Admin | Print this page

This guest entry about Missouri's Environmental Covenant Act comes from Andrew Brought of Spencer Fane's Environmental Law Practice Group. Given the issues property owners face with land use and site activities, the use of an environmental covenant can give said owners a significant advantage when used effectively.

Businesses that own contaminated property in Missouri, such as brownfield sites and former industrial locations, can avail themselves of Missouri’s Environmental Covenant Act (MoECA), RSMo Section 260.1000 et seq., 10 CSR 25-18.010(18), to expedite cleanup and, if site conditions allow, beneficial reuse of those properties. In particular, property owners can record an environmental covenant on their property that restricts certain land uses and site activities to minimize exposure to impacted soils and groundwater.

When coupled with a risk-based cleanup approach, an environmental covenant can present significant advantages to a property owner. Most notably, a company can clean up a site based on human health and environmental risks associated with appropriately tailored uses of the property, such as cleaning up an industrial property to satisfy industrial standards as opposed to residential standards.

The most common types of activity and use limitations found in environmental covenants include:
• residential use restrictions;
• prohibitions on drilling of groundwater wells and the use of groundwater for domestic purposes; and
• limitations on disturbance of surface and subsurface soils.

Environmental covenants like other property interests are recorded in a property’s chain of title to provide notice to prospective buyers of the specific activity and use limitations imposed by the restrictions.

Missouri, along with more than 20 other states, has adopted a version of the Uniform Environmental Covenants Act. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) has a “model” environmental covenant used by the agency in situations where MDNR is the sole overseeing Department and a second model covenant in which both EPA and MDNR are the overseeing agencies.

The provisions in the new model Environmental Covenant differ only somewhat from the provisions in the prior model Environmental Covenant, but the new model serves as a reminder that Missouri has a robust risk-based cleanup program when it is neither pragmatic nor cost-effective to clean up sites to residential levels. The use of Missouri's risk-based program should be carefully evaluated considering site-specific circumstances.